Japanese scientists created a self-healing glass

The most vulnerable point of modern smartphones is the display - any fall on a hard surface can result in broken glass. Coatings with increased resistance to shocks (like Motorola's ShatterShield) are also not without flaws and are usually poorly protected from scratches. The solution to the problem can be self-healing surfaces, especially since scientists from the University of Tokyo managed to obtain such material.

Japanese scientists created a self-healing glass

The most vulnerable point of modern smartphones is the display - any fall on a hard surface can result in broken glass. Coatings with increased resistance to shocks (like Motorola's ShatterShield) are also not without flaws and are usually poorly protected from scratches. The solution to the problem can be self-healing surfaces, especially since scientists from the University of Tokyo managed to obtain such material.

How it works?

The ability to "heal" damage was discovered completely by accident. The team was working on new sticky substances, and Graduate Yuu Yanagisawa noticed that stacked together plates of rubber-like polymer - polythiourea - are connected to each other under pressure. After 30 seconds they become one whole, and after a few hours the material completely restores its properties.

Most importantly, regeneration takes place at room temperature. Usually, such compounds must first be heated before melting. According to the graduate student, he did not believe the results and repeated the experiment several times to confirm.

What's next?

The authors of the development have not yet thought about the practical application of technology, but their colleagues at the University of California at Riverside promise the first devices with a self-renewing coating in the next three years. LG G Flex is not even dreamed of.

Source: The Guardian

Read in Russian: Японские ученые создали самовосстанавливающееся стекло

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